I found this site

We invite comments, suggestions and opinions from professional women. Please email us your first name, location and your feedback and we will publish it on our message board below. Please speak out and tell us how The National Organization for Househusbands can improve your professional and personal life. What laws do we need to suggest, what classes do we need to provide, what support do we need to offer?

 

Yulie – New Jersey
Namelesswriter21@aol.com

I found this site to be quite interesting. I never knew there was an organization like this in existence. Good to see some support towards an alternative lifestyle for men and women. Times have changed. It's about time someone noticed that a woman's place is not necessarily the kitchen/primary caretaker and a man's place is not necessarily the office. As a feminist, I believe the responsibility lies in both partners' hands. “You can only change your mind if you don't mind the change”

ML
-Anonymous-

Something that I think is pretty interesting is how much attitudes and perceptions need to be changed before there are more men doing what I am doing. Take the issues of physical strength and what is defined as “macho.” Most jobs today are in the service economy (lawyers, doctors, accountants, bankers, etc.) where physical strength is irrelevant. Yet we still have our traditional idea that “being a man” involves working outside the home and earning the bucks. That's just plain stupid, at least today.

So why don't we redefine things? Take Terri and me. Of us, I have the job that involves by far the most physical work – lifting kids in and out of car seats, lugging groceries around, sweeping, and mopping. Why aren't those things considered macho? I'm not saying it's the most important thing on earth, but who is really better suited to doing heavy physical work at home – men or wymyn? The answer is obvious. And it's even more obvious when the wymyn is pregnant.

Men, like it or not, thrive on praise and being called important. So, why can't we treat childcare and homecare as important, physical jobs? If so, men would sing the virtues of shopping, cooking and cleaning and would probably compete to see who could do the most in the least amount of time. And you wymyn could reap the benefits. Sounds like a win-win situation.

Karla – Miami, Florida
kar16278@aol.com

I stumbled across this website by accident. I am so pleased to see that we finally have an organization that is addressing these most needed issues for women who work. I applaud and support your goals. Do you have a mailing list?

Helena – Santa Barbara, California
iluv2cell29@hotmaill.com

I wish I had a househusband. I am getting very tired of working a full day and coming home to a husband whose first question is, “what's for dinner”. I mean he could be home hours before I get home from work and yet he won't even think to start preparing dinner or take care of some laundry or cleaning. Show me where it says in the marriage rule book where a woman has to be the one who always cooks and cleans and picks up after her husband. I would be happy if my husband just did one quarter of the hosehold chores. Having a househusband seems like a fantasy more than reality, but I am hearing more and more about men staying at home. I really encourage and support that. I guess I am jealous of today's women because it seems that men are more willing to contribute around the house than men from my generation. Keep up the good work.

Brooklynn Kinney – Los Angeles, California
EmaMonkey@aol.com

It is exciting to see your website up and generating interest in the evolving societal gender roles. I applaud the organization's role in fighting prejudice against men who are embracing the role of the househusband. It is certainly a fascinating time in history and it is good to know that organizations like yours are taking a positive and actively part in the changes.

Jay – Maryland
bukiman2002@yahoo.com


I am glad to see this organization starting and our country moving in the right direction by creating more opportunity for Women to advance to positions of authority. The movement for Career Women and househusbands can only mean a safer, cleaner, more pleasant world to live in. Although still single, I want my future wife to have every opportunity to succeed and I would like to have the option of staying home to support Her without societal stigma.

Mary – Maryland
maebrat@dmv.com

I am writing in support of your website. I am a career woman that is wanting to go back to school to pursue my P.h.d in Education. My husband has always been incredibily supportive and I would like to take this opportunity to give him long overdue credit for his efforts. On numerous occations I have been the primary breadwinner. He takes the lead at home. I have often thought that his efforts to support me deserve applause. He is the most thoughtful guy and a wonderful cook. He enjoys making the house look nice and wants to be the caretaker, gardener, chef, housekeeper and handyman. We have been toying with the idea of making his profession that of househusband. My family is going nuts because they think he should be out making as much as I do. I'm the one with the most earning potential and the highest level of education. I think he deserves the right to make the choice to stay home as much as I deserve the right to pursue a higher career aspiration. So here's to my super husband. A man deserving of cudo's and all the love I can give him. I appreciate him soooo much. I hope every woman and man reading this takes a moment to contemplate the beauty of a man willing to stay home and take care of his family. It is a beautiful thing and a wave of the future!

Laura – San Francisco, CA
touche@sonic.net

One small step for man, one giant leap for woman. I have been seeing more and more men staying home with kids so their wife can succeed for herself first, and family second. Now if only we can get women paid the same or better then men. hahaha

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